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  • Fullbody Bible.

    Full Body Training Routines That Kick Ass

    Recently there has been a renaissance in the “full body” training routines, thanks in large part to people like Ken Leistner, Stuart McRobert, Ellington Darden as well as the rebirth of the classic Bill Starr 5×5 routine, thanks to Glen Pendlay, Mark Rippetoe and websites like Madcow’s and Stronglifts. These routines which are intense and use only compound exercises, which makes them about as “old school” as you can get.

    This is the way that the legends of the golden era of bodybuilding in the 1950s used to train. People like Reg Park, Steve Reeves, Armand Tanny, Vince Gironda and John Grimek all used these sorts of 3 day a week, full body routines to get huge. Chuck Sipes and Reg Park were both 500-pound bench pressers! Pat Casey, the first man to ever bench press 600 pounds, trained with a full body routine too! Any of these guys would likely be found to have more athletic-looking physiques than the average GH-fuelled pros today by the vast majority of the general public. Most of these guys were extremely athletic too.

    The fact that legendary football trainer Bill Starr’s “The Strong Shall Survive” and John McCallum’s “The Complete Keys to Progress” are still bestsellers today speaks for itself. These two books, for example contained routines that have been modified and reinterpreted somewhat by many, but the core ideas and structure behind them still prove to be true: full body workouts are the most efficient way for beginners (and the average cubicle warrior) to gain a lot of muscle really quick. Full body workouts are the most metabolically stimulative way to train, and are best for getting that lean and athletic look, while getting stronger. They are ideal for providing the base for a beginner (check out Mark Rippetoe’s excellent “Starting Strength”, which is likely the best book on the planet aimed at getting young people stronger for either powerlifting or sports).

    How to go about setting up a full body routine?

    When setting up your full body routine, there are some things that you have to consider, of which your recovery ability is perhaps the most important. If you are a fairly new trainer, with less than a year or so under your belt, or are young – say under 25 years old, then your recovery ability and consequently the volume and frequency of your workouts can be higher than an older trainer – even one who has trained for 20 years.

    An older trainer over 40 who has trained for 20 years off and on might be able to use more resistance in their exercises, but that will necessitate larger amounts of time in between training sessions as greater resistance creates a greater aggregate stress on the nervous system. Think of your body is a well of energy, the same amount of energy used to power you through a workout is the same source of energy used to recover from the workout. If you run the well dry with too many training sessions with not enough rest in between them, you could be short changing yourself in terms of muscle gains.

    The key variables to consider in any training routine (split of full body) are 1) volume, 2) frequency and 3) intensity (Intensity= (Volume x Weight used)/Rest time).

    The key variables in the supercompensation phase of muscle growth are 1) diet, 2) rest and 3) stress. Take stock of your age, the experience you have in training and the amount of stress in your life at any given time as well and adjust your training accordingly.

    Full Body #1

    Day One

    Squat – 3-5 x 5-15
    Stiff Legged Deadlift – 3 x 10-15
    Bench Press – 3-5 x 5-15
    Pullups or Chin -3-5 x 5-15
    Calf Raises – 2 x 5-20
    Crunches – 2 x 5-20


    Day Two

    Deadlift – 3-5 x 5-15
    Military Press – 3-5 x 5-15
    Close Grip Bench Press or Dips – 2-3 x 5-15
    Barbell Curl – 3-5 x 5-15
    Wrist Curls – 2 x 15-20
    Reverse Crunches – 2 x 5-15


    Full Body #2

    Day One

    Squat – 3×10
    Bench – 3×6
    Chins or Pulldowns – 3×6
    Calf Raises – 3×15
    Crunches – 3×12


    Day Two

    Leg Presses – 2×15
    Partial Deadlifts – 3×6
    Seated Dumbbell Press – 3×6
    One Arm Dumbbell Rows – 3×8
    Dumbbell Curls – 3×12

    Both of these programs are as efficient as you can get to balanced, practical full body training.


    One issue that comes up with full body training is balancing your assistance work. One really good approach is to make one of the two workouts all lower body assistance work and the other one, all upper body assistance. The first of the following workouts will allow you to hit bench while scorching your legs, and the next one you can annihilate your whole upper body!

    Full Body #3

    Day One

    Squat – 3-5 x 5-15
    Bench Press – 3-5 x 5-15
    Lunges -3-5 x 5-15
    Glute-Ham Raises – 2 x 5-20
    Calf Raises – 2 x 5-20

    Day Two

    Partial Deadlift/Rack Pulls – 3-5 x 5-15
    Military Press – 3-5 x 5-15
    Weighted Chins with Curl Grip – 3-5 x 5-15
    Weighted Dips – 2-3 x 5-15
    Dumbbell Curls – 2 x 15-20
    Skeggǫld, Skálmǫld, Skildir ro Klofnir.


  • #2
    No Bull Full Body Training:
    Most trainers and fitness buffs will agree that full body workouts are great for beginners since they build a structural foundation for developing strength and size. Unfortunately many don’t think of ever revisiting this type of training which could yield great results and give their bodies a much needed rest.

    Some of the greatest physiques to ever walk the face of the planet were built based on simple but effective full body routines. The Golden Era of bodybuilding (starting in the 1950s ) showcased legends such as Reg Park, Steve Reeves and the ‘Iron Guru’,Vince Gironda. They all had one thing in common…they loved to use full body routines!



    Larry Scott hanging out in front of Vince’s Gym with an ice cream cone…HA!

    Why full body routines?

    So these legends of bodybuilding structured their training programs around full body routines. Why you ask?

    -Full body routines done with compound movements not only build muscle but are a metabolic “jump-starter”, torching body fat and burning calories. The more muscle fibers you hit in one workout, the more calories you’re going to expend.

    – It’s also great for beginners or individuals coming back from an injury due to the recovery period in between workouts. You’re more likely to recover training full body 3 times a week since traditional body part split training overlaps muscle groups being worked, which can lead to injury.
    -For those of you with a hectic schedule this is an effective and efficient option. There’s no need to hit the gym 6 days a week with a body part split when you’re hitting every muscle group in half the amount of time.

    If you don’t see the benefits in trying a full body routine…Vince Gironda has a message for you…



    Setting up a routine:

    -Aim to train for 2-3 days per week with at least 1-2 days rest in between. Recovery is as if not more important than training!
    -Some key variables to remember when starting this program are volume, frequency and intensity. You must adjust these based on your age, training experience and overall stress levels. Since each workout is very taxing on the nervous system it is important to do a routine that will not over train or lead to injury.

    Full body routines:

    The following routines offer overall balance with compound exercises being the base and assistance work thrown in to complete the workout.

    Routine 1:
    Option A
    Back Squat: 3-5 sets of 5-8 reps
    Romanian Deadlifts:3-5 sets of 5-8 reps
    Bench Press: 3-5 sets of 5-8 reps
    Wide Grip Pull up: 3 sets of 10 reps. You can do this classic back builder at home using
    Calf raise: 3 sets of 12-15 reps
    Planks/vaccuum pose: 4 sets of 30 seconds

    Option B
    Deadlifts:3-5 sets of 5-8 reps
    Military press: 3-5 sets of 5-8 reps
    Close grip bench press: 3-5 sets of 5-8 reps
    Barbell curl: 3 sets of 10 reps
    Wrist curl/hammer curl: 3 sets of 10 reps
    Leg raise( on floor or on Roman chair): 4 sets of 12-15 reps

    Routine 2:

    Option A
    Front squat: 3-5 sets of 5-8 reps
    Incline press: 3-5 sets of 5-8 reps. Adjust the
    Chin up/underhand row: 3 sets of 10 reps
    Calf raise: 3 sets of 12-15 reps
    Cable crunch: 4 sets of 10-12 reps

    Option B
    Leg press: 3-5 sets of 5-8 reps
    Romanian deadlift: 3-5 sets of 5-8 reps
    Dumbbell military press: 3-5 sets of 5-8 reps
    One arm dumbbell row: 3 sets of 10 reps
    Dumbbell curls(alternating): 3 sets of 10-12 reps
    Weighted dips: 4 sets of 8-12 reps.

    Here is an example of how you would implement this routine throughout the week:

    Using Routine 1
    Week 1
    Monday- A
    Wednesday-B
    Friday-A

    Using Routine 2
    Week 2
    Monday- B
    Wednesday- A
    Friday- B

    Of course you can swap routine 1 and 2 from week to week but focus on balance. You’ll also notice each workout starts with heavy compound movements which are followed by assistance work.

    No Bull Conclusion:

    If you’ve read any of my previous articles you’ll know I’m a huge advocate of old school training principles. Training routines and methods that were tried and true in the 1950s will be just as effective today. If you’re a beginner or a injury prone gym rat looking to pack on muscle and burn fat in less time, full body routines are a perfect option for you. For those of you who are veterans in the iron game who are looking to stay muscular without having to hit the gym 6 days a week, give these workouts a shot.

    As I always stress…if you train smart and basic there is no need for fancy gym equipment. Old school dumbbells and barbells will get the job done! Thanks for reading.
    Skeggǫld, Skálmǫld, Skildir ro Klofnir.

    Comment


    • #3
      The John Grimek Full Body Workout

      In this modern bodybuilding era of cutting edge supplementation, scientific research, gimmicky isolation machines and fad workout programmes, it seems the basics of old-school bodybuilding have long been forgotten.

      Turn the clock back 60-70 years and gymnasiums were a different place. There were no "scientifically-proven" split routines, no teenagers gulping down dodgy looking pre-workout, performing endless repetitions on the pec dec, listening to their "Black Eyed Peas Mega Pump Mix", and making no gains whatsoever. Instead, gym goers adhered to the simple and honest principles of their Golden Era idols.

      And these principles worked - plain and simple.

      In an era before steroids, high volume workouts and the Weider publishing empire, champion bodybuilders such as Reg Park, Peary Rader and Steve Reeves built their physiques by adopting full body routines and working as hard as possible on a limited number of basic compound movements every session. In those days, the emphasis was on building an athletic, healthy and functionally strong physique rather than getting a "super wicked pump" by hitting 5x12 on the tricep pulldown machine. Ultimately the credo was, as Reg Park pointed out: "If you want to get bigger, then get stronger!"

      And one of the strongest - and greatest - of the old-school lifters was a man called John Grimek, a true icon of the sport who pioneered many of today's tried-and-tested bodybuilding principles.

      Introducing John Grimek

      John 'The Monarch of Muscledom' Grimek - who never lost a contest in his career - was the biggest name in bodybuilding during the 1930s and 1940, twice winning the coveted AAU Mr. America.

      According to the legendary Steve Reeves, Grimek was "the greatest bodybuilder that ever lived" - praise indeed coming from Hercules himself!

      And in addition to boasting a supremely muscular and world-beating physique, Grimek was - like the greatest of the old the Golden Era legends - every bit as strong as he looked.

      In 1936 he competed for the USA in the infamous Berlin Olympic Games and at one point in his career he held the American and World Record for the Overhead Press.

      Today I'm going to take a closer look at one of John Grimek's favourite muscle building routines which is based around his philosophies for building size and strength.

      The John Grimek Full Body Workout

      This full body routine, which was published by Grimek after he retired from competitive bodybuilding, is built around a core of basic compound movements but also features a range of single joint exercises. This routine also makes use of the now common 3x10 training protocol, of which Grimek was one of the first ever proponents of:

      Monday
      •Bench Press: 3 sets, 10 reps
      •Chin Ups or Pull Downs: 3 sets, 10 reps
      •Military Press: 3 sets, 10 reps
      •Barbell Curls: 3 sets, 10 reps
      •Squats: 3 sets, 10 reps
      •Standing Calf Raises: 3 sets, 10 reps

      Wednesday
      •Incline Press or Dips: 3 sets, 10 reps
      •Barbell Row or Dumbbell Row: 3 sets, 10 reps
      •Shrusg: 3 sets, 10 reps
      •Single Arm Preacher Curl: 3 sets, 10 reps
      •Leg Curl: 3 sets, 10 reps
      •Abs: 1 set, 50 reps

      Friday
      •Chin Ups or Pull Downs: 3 sets, 10 reps
      •Military Press: 3 sets, 10 reps
      •Incline Dumbbell Curls: 3 sets, 10 reps
      •Front Squats: 3 sets, 10 reps
      •Stiff Legged Deadlift: 3 sets, 10 reps

      Notes

      Schedule

      This routine should be performed only 3 days per week - making the most of rest days to recover and grow. Remember, the body needs to recover - the absolute key to muscle growth is recovery - so hit it hard and then give it some breathing space to grow!

      Rest

      Don't slack off with your rest between sets, keep the intensity high. Grimek advised that lifters take between 45 seconds and 1 minute rest between sets and between 2 to 3 minutes rest between exercises.

      Form

      Good form is paramount - and John Grimek was a stickler for this. All reps should be slow and controlled - perform reps until you can longer maintain perfect form. Swinging, jerking of bouncing the bar will just hinder progress.

      Diet

      As with any bodybuilding routine, nutrition is just as - if not more - important than what you are lifting in the gym. If you want to replicate what the old-timers did, fuel your muscle growth by feasting on meals of red meat, whole cream milk, honey, whole eggs, fruit and nuts.

      Thoughts

      Don't be fooled into thinking this is an outdated - or oversimplified - routine. I'm yet to find a training protocol more effective than these old-school full-body routines. By working hard on the basic compound movements and getting lots of rest and good food, you will gain strength and size rapidly, just like the old-timers were able to - before steroids entered the equation.

      As Grimek himself pointed out, when asked what his advice would be to new lifters, all you need to do is: "Train consistently 2-3 days per week and add weight to the bar whenever possible and get lots of rest, eat good food and drink plenty of water."

      So no need to overcomplicate the matter - just keep it simple stupid! After all, keep in mind that every single title-winning bodybuilder in the pre-steroid built their physique using these principles.

      In addition, the good thing about this John Gimek routine in particular is that it is a lot more achievable than the majority of Golden Era full body workouts that have previously been published. Many of Steve Reeves' published routines, for example, featured over 40 sets - a tall order for anyone who isn't a professional athlete! With this John Grimek routine you'll be hitting between 16-18 sets per session, which shouldn't take more than an hour to complete.

      Summary

      This John Grimek training programme is an extremely effective - and manageable - full-body routine for building muscle and establishing a well-rounded, functional physique.

      If you've been struggling to see solid results with a typical bodypart split routine (if you're not on anabolic steroids why train like someone that is?), give this John Grimek programme a go instead and see how you get on.

      Provided you're eating well, sleeping and getting lots of rest, you will see gains on this routine, there's no two ways about
      Skeggǫld, Skálmǫld, Skildir ro Klofnir.

      Comment


      • #4
        Echt nice deze artikelen, thnx voor t delen

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Swiftl3n View Post
          Echt nice deze artikelen, thnx voor t delen
          Geen probleem. Hopelijk heb je er wat aan.
          Skeggǫld, Skálmǫld, Skildir ro Klofnir.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Swiftl3n View Post
            Echt nice deze artikelen, thnx voor t delen
            Mijn persoonlijke voorkeur zou uitgaan naar het onderstaande:


            Fullbody A/B/A

            A
            Squat 3-5 sets of 5-8 reps
            Romanian Deadlifts 3-5 sets of 5-8 reps
            Bench press 3-5 sets of 5-8 reps
            Pull ups 3-5 sets of 5-8 reps
            Calf raises 3 sets of 15
            Ab rollouts 3 sets of 15

            B
            Deadlift 3-5 sets of 5-8 reps
            Overhead press 3-5 sets of 5-8 reps
            Bent over row 3-5 sets of 5-8 reps
            Close grip bench press/Dips 3-5 sets of 5-8 reps
            Bent over raises 3 sets of 15 reps
            Barbell curls 3 sets of 15 reps
            Skeggǫld, Skálmǫld, Skildir ro Klofnir.

            Comment


            • #7
              Informatief artikel! Is het altijd nodig om 1 dag rust te houden? Aangezien er over het algemeen maar 1 compound per spiergroep word gedaan per dag.
              “Impossible is just a big word thrown around by small men who find it easier to live in the world they’ve been given than to explore the power they have to change it. Impossible is not a fact. It’s an opinion. Impossible is not a declaration. It’s a dare. Impossible is potential. Impossible is temporary. Impossible is nothing.” – Muhammad Ali

              Comment


              • #8
                Thx , heb alle artikelen opgeslagen op m'n laptop. Wanneer ik in de toekomst een nieuw schema moet pak ik zeker één van bovenstaande!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Mooi artikel! Deze ga ik ff bookmarken.
                  Kan ik vergelijken wat ik na mijn 5x5 ga doen! (Is nog wel eventjes)
                  The act of getting strong doesn't start in the gym. It starts in your head.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Twenties View Post
                    Informatief artikel! Is het altijd nodig om 1 dag rust te houden? Aangezien er over het algemeen maar 1 compound per spiergroep word gedaan per dag.
                    Dat wordt wel aangeraden ja. Nou maakt het voor één keer niet uit als je ze achter elkaar doet. Als je maar niet voor een langere periode vier fullbody's gaat doen, want dat breekt je op.

                    Originally posted by Swiftl3n View Post
                    Thx , heb alle artikelen opgeslagen op m'n laptop. Wanneer ik in de toekomst een nieuw schema moet pak ik zeker één van bovenstaande!
                    Geen probleem.

                    Originally posted by Malinois View Post
                    Mooi artikel! Deze ga ik ff bookmarken.
                    Kan ik vergelijken wat ik na mijn 5x5 ga doen! (Is nog wel eventjes)
                    Meeste van deze trainingen is 5x5. Jij bedoeld Stronglifts?
                    Skeggǫld, Skálmǫld, Skildir ro Klofnir.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Aldo Raine View Post

                      Meeste van deze trainingen is 5x5. Jij bedoeld Stronglifts?
                      Yep, eigenlijk bedoelde ik Stronglifts
                      The act of getting strong doesn't start in the gym. It starts in your head.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The Reg Park Way To Serious Size And Strength

                        "Training is like life, you get your ups and downs, but if you think about your problems hard enough and logically enough, you'll either solve them or reach a compromise." – Reg Park

                        If your goal is to develop a powerful physique that is every bit as strong as it looks, you can't do much better than to follow the example of three time Mr. Universe, Reg Park. Arnold Schwarzenegger often refers to Reg Park as his childhood idol and the greatest inspiration and influence on his own bodybuilding and life successes.

                        In this article we'll take a closer look at Reg's training philosophy and cover his very popular and highly effective 5x5 program as well. Even if you don't care about getting bigger, if you want to develop a lean and strong physique, Reg is the man to emulate.




                        1 – If you want to get bigger, then get stronger

                        Many people training today separate hypertrophy training from strength training. They think that when focusing on getting bigger, one should focus on the muscle not how much weight one is using. This explains why today's bodybuilders are nowhere near as strong as the old school bodybuilders like Reg Park.
                        Reg didn't separate strength training from bodybuilding. He believed that in order to get bigger, you must get stronger. Heavy weight training equals more recruited muscle fibers, which equals more muscular growth. The only difference, says Reg, is that the pure strength trainer shouldn't increase caloric intake to avoid putting on size, while the bodybuilder should ramp up high quality nutrition in order to pack on more size.

                        2 – Focus on compound movements

                        Reg believed in spending time on exercises that produce the maximum return. The cornerstone of his training was a healthy diet of squats, deadlifts, and bench presses, which he called the primary strength exercises. Secondary or supplementary exercises were cleans, high pulls, and clean and presses.

                        Personally, I'd replace the bench press with the standing military press, and throw in some pull-ups or bent over rows to balance the upper body. Regardless, Reg knew what he was doing, and had the results to back it up. Most trainees won't go wrong with a focus on the three primary lifts. Once you get your bench up to 300 pounds, and your
                        squat and deadlift up to 400 pounds, you'll notice a big difference in how your physique looks.





                        The result of a healthy diet of squats, deadlifts, and bench presses.


                        If you don't want to get bigger, just keep your calories in check. For most trainees, worrying about getting too big is like worrying about making too much money. There are better problems to focus your attention on. Build a strong foundation on the three primary exercises, then add some supplementary exercises to round out your program and keep progress coming.

                        3 – Don't let your lower back hold you back

                        If you've ever had a lower back injury, you know how important the lower back is to overall strength and power. We generate a lot of power from our backs and just because we can't see it in the mirror doesn't mean that it's not important.
                        Many trainees avoid doing any direct lower back work, because they don't want to strain their back. Then, ironically, they get lower back pains. The bottom line is if you have a weak back, you have a weak body. To avoid lower back pain and to build a strong and powerful physique, Reg believed that all training should include prone hyperextensions to keep the lower back strong and healthy.

                        Most gyms have hyperextension equipment, and if you're lucky your gym has Louie Simmons' reverse hyper machine. Start with a couple sets of ten with your bodyweight and then start adding weight. Progress slowly and carefully. You're not trying to set a PR on the hyperextension by seeing how much weight you can use for one rep, you're using it as a preventive measure to avoid lower back injuries and keep your back strong and healthy.



                        The Louie Simmons reverse hyperextension machine


                        After a few weeks of lower back work, don't be surprised if you notice a strength increase on overhead presses, deadlifts, and squats. Especially if you haven't done any direct lower back before.

                        4 – Confidence is critical for increased size and strength

                        According to Reg, an effective training program focuses on increasing confidence. You should feel strong, empowered, and ready to take on the world after each workout. If you feel weak and defeated, then you're doing something wrong.

                        Imagine having a job in which you progressively work harder each month to make the same amount of money. Most people would find this absurd, and change jobs. Working smart means making more money for the same amount of effort, or better yet, working less and making more.
                        Training is no different. Rather than going overboard and burning out, focus on the minimum training dose that'll produce the maximum result. You can always add more if necessary.

                        Reg also believed that training to failure too often is a big mistake. If you train to failure too often, and miss a lot of lifts, your confidence will plummet, and so will your strength and size. Gradual progression is the way to go rather than having the illusion that strength and size will come in leaps and bounds. Have a long-term approach and enjoy the process.

                        5 – You must know yourself to get the most out of training

                        Reg was a big believer in self-analysis. You must take the time to find out who you are, and what you're capable of. He stated that if you worry a lot, then you'll find great benefit from training, as it'll help remove stress, and help you get a better handle on your life. You learn a lot about yourself through training that can help you in other areas of your life.

                        Trainees who make the mistake of compartmentalizing their training lives from the rest of their lives miss out on these lessons. We learn the power of discipline, perseverance, patience, and hard work from training. Carry over these skills into your business or job, and you'll benefit tremendously.

                        If you're strong in the gym but weak in your personal and professional life, then you're weak overall. Carry over what you've learned from effective training to other areas of your life and you'll experience the full benefits of training.

                        6 – Layoffs and restoration are critical

                        We live in a workaholic society, in which we think that more is better across the board. We feel it's critical to work longer hours to get ahead and make more money, thinking that we will be much happier only to want more after we make more.

                        Many serious trainees take this workaholic mentality into the training realm, not only training far too often, but also not recovering enough. The idea of taking an entire week off would be unthinkable to them. Regardless, training must be balanced with adequate recovery.
                        Reg believed that layoffs are important to build up reserves, and to allow the body to rest. Moreover, when you take some time away from training you can't wait to get back at it and have a renewed enthusiasm to push forward. Just as it is beneficial to take time off from work and enjoy a vacation it is critical to take a training vacation periodically.

                        When you take a layoff, don't even think about training. Immerse yourself in other activities and enjoy the time away from working out. Don't read training books and magazines all day and analyze your workouts. A mental break is just as important as a physical break.
                        Get a relaxation massage at the beginning of your layoff. Many trainees always ask for a deep tissue massage no matter what, but this generic approach isn't the way to go. Find a high quality bodyworker who can give you a personalized massage based on the state you're in. He or she will know what you need.

                        7 – Start reaping the benefits of the 5x5 program

                        Most people think they know all about the 5x5 program, Reg's favorite strategy for packing on strength and size. Just pick a weight and use it for five sets. When you can do five reps on all five sets, add weight. Don't increase the weight until you can do five reps for all five sets. This allows for a gradual progression and an avoidance of burning out. Simple, right? Yes, but this isn't the 5x5 version that Reg used and recommended.

                        In Reg's 5x5 program, the first two sets are warm-ups, and the last three are the primary work sets. For example, if you're using 200 pounds for the primary sets on the military press, it would look like this: 160 x 5, 180 x 5, 200 x 3 x 5. When you can use 200 pounds for the last three sets of five, increase the poundage by five pounds on all five sets to take it to 165 x 5, 185 x 5, 205 x 3x5. Reg referred to the three primary sets as the stabilizer sets.

                        When you can do a given weight for three sets of five, you've locked that weight in, and are ready to move up. You can start with lighter weights for the first two warm-up sets, but make sure the poundage jumps from the first to the second set and from the second to the third set are the same. The first two sets are confidence-builders. Thus, if you feel tired on the first confidence-building sets, do one or two more to build up reassurance to attack the three primary sets.
                        Unlike many of today's bodybuilders that take very short breaks in between each set, Reg recommended 3-5 minute breaks to recover fully from each set. Also, focus on using as much weight as possible for each set, to acquire the greatest return on your effort.

                        Reg Park-Inspired 5x5 Programs

                        Option 1: (Two sessions per week, for busy people or trainees with poor recovery)

                        Monday

                        Hyperextensions 3x10 (one minute breaks)
                        A1. Standing barbell military press 5x5
                        A2. Barbell bent-over row 5x5
                        Take two-minute breaks in between each set of A1 and A2. Go back and forth until all of the sets have been completed.
                        Barbell squat 5x5 (three minute breaks in between each set)


                        Thursday

                        Hyperextensions 3x10 (one minute breaks)
                        A1. Weighted dip 5x5
                        A2. Weighted pull-up 5x5
                        Take two-minute breaks in between each set of A1 and A2. Go back and forth until all of the sets have been completed.
                        Barbell deadlift 5x5 (three minute breaks in between each set)

                        Option 2: (three sessions per week, for trainees who have more time and adequate recovery)

                        Monday

                        Hyperextensions 3x10 (one minute breaks)
                        A1. Standing barbell military press 5x5
                        A2. Barbell bent-over row 5x5

                        Take two-minute breaks in between each set of A1 and A2. Go back and forth until all of the sets have been completed.

                        Barbell squat 5x5 (three minute breaks in between each set)


                        Wednesday

                        Hyperextensions 3x10 (one minute breaks)
                        A1. Weighted dip 5x5
                        A2. Weighted pull-up 5x5

                        Take two-minute breaks in between each set of A1 and A2. Repeat until all of the sets have been completed.

                        Barbell deadlift 5x5 (three minute breaks in between each set)


                        Friday

                        Hyperextensions 3x10 (one minute breaks)
                        A1. Incline barbell press 5x5
                        A2. Dumbbell renegade row 5x5

                        Take two-minute breaks in between each set of A1 and A2. Repeat until all of the sets have been completed.

                        Barbell squat 5x5 (three minute breaks in between each set)


                        Option 3: (3x per week for advanced trainees who have great recovery abilities)


                        Monday

                        Hyperextensions 3x10 (one minute breaks)
                        Barbell military press 5x5
                        Weighted pull-ups 5x5
                        Barbell squat 5x5
                        Romanian deadlift 5x5
                        Barbell curl 2x5
                        Close-grip bench press 2x5
                        Calf raise 3x12


                        Wednesday

                        Hyperextensions 3x10 (one minute breaks)
                        Bench press 5x5
                        Barbell bent-over row 5x5
                        Power clean 5x3
                        Barbell deadlift 5x5
                        Dumbbell curl 2x5
                        Weighted dip 2x5
                        Calf Raise 3x12


                        Friday

                        Hyperextensions 3x10 (one minute breaks)
                        Dumbbell clean and press 5x5
                        Weighted pull-up 5x5
                        Barbell squat 5x5
                        Dumbbell lunge 5x5
                        Barbell curl 2x5
                        Close-grip bench press 2x5
                        Calf raise 3x12

                        Take one-minute breaks in between each exercise and three-minute breaks in between each set.

                        Skeggǫld, Skálmǫld, Skildir ro Klofnir.

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                        • #13
                          Bill Starr’s 5 x 5 Training

                          Perhaps the most influential book ever written on the subject of strength training for sports is Bill Starr’s “The Strongest Shall Survive: Strength Training for Football” written in 1976. Since then, seemingly endless variations of Starr’s original 5×5 routine have sprouted up all over the Net and for good reason – it is possibly the most perfect strength routine ever devised.

                          His routine focused on bench presses, squats and power cleans, done on a Monday – Wednesday – Friday rotation with heavy, medium and light days. Bill Starr popularized the “5×5″ routine – each exercise was done following a protocol of five sets of five reps. Starr’s 5×5 routine uses the three exercises which Starr referred to as “the big three”, quoting Starr:
                          These are 3 basic exercises used by weightlifters to increase their strength….the football player (and you can insert Martial Artist, Fighter, whatever there) must work for overall body strength as opposed to specific strengthening exercises….In other words the athlete should be building total leg strength rather than just stronger hamstrings. He should be seeking overall strength in his shoulder girdle rather than just stronger deltoids….the program is fast, simple and, most importantly, effective. It requires very little space and a minimum of equipment….”

                          Bill Starr’s 5X5 Routine In Its Original Form


                          Monday – Heavy

                          Power cleans – 5 sets of 5
                          Bench – 5 sets of 5 1×10 weight from 3rd set
                          (add 10 rep sets after 8-12 weeks on program)
                          Squats – 5 sets of 5 1×10 weight from 3rd set
                          (set 1 35% of target set 2 70% of target set 3 80% of target set 4 90% of target set 5 target)

                          Wednesday – Light

                          Power cleans – 5 sets of 5
                          Incline Bench – 5 sets of 5 1×10 weight from 3rd set
                          Squats – 5 sets of 5
                          (1×10 weight from 3rd set set 5 use weight from 3rd set of Monday)

                          Friday – Medium

                          Power cleans – 5 sets of 5
                          Overhead press – 5 sets of 5 1×10 weight from 3rd set
                          Squats – 5 sets of 5
                          (1×10 weight from 3rd set set 5 use weight from 3rd set of Monday set 5 use weight 4th set of Monday)


                          The Bill Starr Power Routine

                          Monday – Heavy Day

                          Squat – 5 sets of 5
                          Bench – 5 sets of 5
                          Powerclean – 5 sets of 5
                          Weighted hyperextensions – 2 sets
                          Weighted sit-ups – 4 sets


                          Wednesday – Light Day

                          Squat – 4 sets of 5
                          Incline Bench – 4 sets of 5
                          High Pulls – 4 sets of 5
                          Sit-ups – 3 sets

                          Friday – Medium

                          Squat – 4 sets of 5, 1 triple, 1 set of 8
                          Bench – 4 sets of 5, 1 triple, 1 set of 8
                          Powercleans – 4 sets of 5, 1 triple
                          Weighted Dips – 3 sets of 5-8
                          Triceps and Biceps – 3 sets of 8 each


                          Bill Starr’s Beginner 5×5

                          Monday (Heavy Day – 85%)

                          Back Squats 5 x 5 Ramping weight to top set of 5 reps across 5 sets
                          Bench Press 5 x 5 Ramping weight to top set of 5 reps across 5 sets
                          Deadlifts 5 x 5 Ramping weight to top set of 5 reps across 5 sets

                          Wednesday (Light Day – 65-70%)

                          Back Squats 5 x 5 using 60% of Monday’s weight
                          Bench Press 5 x 5 using 60% of Monday’s weight
                          Pullups 5 x 5 Ramping weight to top set of 5 reps across 5 sets

                          Friday (Medium Day – 70-85%)

                          Back Squats 5 x 5 using 80% of Monday’s weight
                          Bench Press 5 x 5 using 80% of Monday’s weight
                          Rows 5 x 5 Ramping weight to top set of 5 reps across 5 sets


                          The Bill Starr Strength Factor Routine

                          Monday (Heavy Day)

                          Back Squats 5 x 5 ramping to limit
                          Bench Press 5 x 5 ramping to limit
                          Deadlifts 5 x 5 ramping to limit or Bent-Over Rows: 5 x 5 ramping to limit
                          Incline Dumbbell Press 2 x 20
                          Calf Raises 3 x 30

                          Wednesday (Light Day)

                          Back Squats 5 x 5 using 50 lbs less than Monday or Lunges: 4 x 6 ramping to limit
                          Good Mornings 4 x 10 or Stiff-Leg Deadlifts: 4 x 10
                          Standing Overhead Press 5 x 5 ramping to limit
                          Dips When you can do 20 reps, start adding weight and drop the reps back to 8
                          Curls 3 x 15

                          Friday (Medium Day)

                          Back Squats 5 x 5 using 20 lbs less than Monday
                          Incline Bench Press 5 x 5 ramping to limit
                          Shrugs 5 x 5 ramping to limit or Clean High Pulls 5 x 5 ramping to limit
                          Straight Arm Pullovers 2 x 20
                          Chins: 4 sets to failure


                          Bill Starr’s “Big 3″ Program

                          Monday – Heavy Day

                          Powerclean – 5 sets of 5
                          Bench – 5 sets of 5
                          Squat – 5 sets of 5

                          Wednesday – Light Day

                          Powerclean – 5 sets of 5
                          Benchpress – 5 sets of 5
                          Squat – 5 sets of 5

                          Friday – Medium

                          Powerclean – 5 sets of 5
                          Benchpress – 5 sets of 5
                          Squat – 5 sets of 5


                          Beyond Bill Starr: Madcow and Mark Rippetoe

                          By far of all of the variations of coach Starr’s original routines, the two of them that are the most used and advanced in term of principles are those ones by “Madcow” and coach Mark Rippetoe. Madcow’ variation isn’t one routine, it features several based on the trainer’s needs and uses deloading phases, dual factor training, and hypertrophy phases.

                          Mark Rippetoe’s “Starting Strength” Novice 5×5 Routine:

                          Workout A

                          Squat – 3×5
                          Bench Press – 3×5
                          Deadlift – 1×5

                          Workout B

                          Squat – 3×5
                          Overhead Press – 3×5
                          Power Clean – 3×5

                          All the sets shown (3×5) are all working or “live” sets, not counting warmups sets. Additional supplementary exercises can be added, but very sparingly. In the case of arms, the biceps/triceps already get enough growth stimulation from heavy presses, rows and chins. Abdominal work can be used as a cool-down. Grip work can be added to the end as needed too. Workouts A and B alternate on 3 non-consecutive days per week. Proof of concept that coach Rippetoe’s novice routine works isn’t only found by the five star rating that “Starting Strength” receives regularly on Amazon.com, but also in numerous threads like this one on the Net.
                          More proof that these variants work on the vast majority of the population can be found on the excellent “StrongLifts” website which features its own variant of Bill Starr’s 5×5. (note: the site also has a vibrant community found on their forums)

                          Mark Rippetoe’s Practical Programming Novice Program

                          Monday

                          Squat – 3×5
                          Bench press / Press (Alternating) – 3×5
                          Chin-ups 3 sets to failure or add weight if completing more than 15 reps

                          Wednesday

                          Squat – 3×5
                          Press / Bench Press (Alternating) – 3×5
                          Deadlift – 3×5

                          Friday

                          3×5 Squat – 3×5
                          Bench Press / Press (Alternating) – 3×5
                          Pull-ups 3 sets to failure
                          (add weight if completing more than 15 reps)


                          Mark Rippetoe’s The Advanced Novice Program

                          Week ADay 1

                          Squat – 3×5
                          Bench press – 3×5
                          Chin-ups – 3 sets
                          (weight added so failure occurs at 5 to 7 reps)

                          Day 2

                          Front Squat – 3×5 OR Light Squat 2×5 (80% 5RM)
                          Press – 3×5
                          Deadlift 1×5

                          Day 3

                          Squat – 3×5
                          Bench press – 3×5
                          Pull-ups – 3 sets to failure, unweighted

                          Week B
                          Day 1

                          Squat – 3×5
                          Press – 3×5
                          Chin-ups – 3 sets to failure, unweighted

                          Day 2

                          Front Squat – 3×5 OR Light Squat 2×5 (80% 5RM)
                          Bench press – 3×5
                          Power clean – 5×3

                          Day 3

                          Squat – 3×5
                          Press – 3×5
                          Pull-ups – 3 sets, weight added so failure occurs at 5 to 7 reps


                          Madcow Intermediate 5×5

                          Monday – Heavy Day

                          Squat – 5 sets of 5
                          Bench – 5 sets of 5
                          Barbell Row or Powerclean – 5 sets of 5
                          Weighted hyperextensions – 2 sets
                          Weighted sit-ups – 4 sets

                          Wednesday – Light Day

                          Squat – 4 sets of 5
                          Incline Bench or Standing Press – 4 sets of 5
                          Deadlift – 4 sets of 5
                          Sit-ups – 3 sets

                          Friday – Medium

                          Squat – 4 sets of 5, 1 triple, 1 set of 8
                          Bench – 4 sets of 5, 1 triple, 1 set of 8
                          Barbell Row or Powerclean – 4 sets of 5, 1 triple, 1 set of 8 for rows
                          Weighted Dips – 3 sets of 5-8
                          Triceps Extension and Biceps Curl – 3 sets of 8 each





                          Skeggǫld, Skálmǫld, Skildir ro Klofnir.

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                          • #14
                            Reg Park’s Beginner Routine

                            Perhaps the finest natural example of the perfect balance between aesthetic physique and phenomenal strength is the late Reg Park. It was Reg Park was the inspiration for a young Arnold Schwarzenegger to pick up his first set of weights. Park won Mr. Britain in 1949 and although there were bodybuilders before him, his level of size and development raised the bar and would not be surpassed until Arnold himself appeared on the competitive scene in the late 1960s. Reg stood 6’1″ and weighed over 250 pounds – standards which were enormous for the time. (comparing the physique of Park to his predecessors would be like us comparing Phil Heath today to the bodybuilders of the 70s!)

                            Reg Park’s Beginner’s routine below was the exact one used by Arnold in his late teens to get jacked. Like Park, Arnold trained at this routine 3 times a week and it comprised mainly of heavy compound movements done with the “5×5″ protocol. But unlike the more popular 5×5 “sets across” that we see in Bill Starr’s routine, Park advocated that sets 1 and 2 are to be warmups for sets 3,4 and 5. In other words, once you hit your max weight for five reps after two warmups, then crank out 3 sets of 5.


                            For example, say your bench press is a max of 225lbs for 5 reps (which is about 90% of 1RM), the first set would be at 60% – 135 lbs, then the next warmup set could be 80% – 185lbs.


                            Reg Park’s Beginner’s Routine

                            Workout A:
                            Back Squats 5×5
                            Chin-Ups or Pull-Ups 5×5
                            Dips or Bench Press 5×5
                            Barbell Curls 2×10
                            Wrist Work 2×10
                            Calves 2×15-20

                            Workout B:
                            Front Squats 5×5
                            Rows 5×5
                            Standing Press 5×5
                            Deadlifts 3×5 (2 warm-up sets and 1 “stabilizer set”)
                            Wrist Work 2×10
                            Calves 2×15-20


                            Training Schedule:
                            Week 1: A, B, A
                            Week 2: B, A, B
                            Week 3: A, B, A and so forth.

                            Skeggǫld, Skálmǫld, Skildir ro Klofnir.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Anthony Ditillo Training Routines

                              1.


                              Even before Stuart McRobert, there was physcial culture writer Anthony Ditillo, who was most known for his articles in Peary Rader’s original Ironman magazine from 1968 to 1985. More proof that there is nothing new under the sun is to be found in his sagely writings, things like the importance of high fat diets in cutting, the dangers of overtraining, using compound muti-joint exercises etc.
                              Charles Poliquin, one of the world’s premier strength coaches, claimed that the book, ‘The Development of Physical Strength’, (a classic that was published in 1982) “I bought it from Iron Man magazine after reading several of his articles. I thought his approach was logical and full of common sense; and more importantly, it worked! It is the only book I have read more than once, and I actually bought a second copy after I misplaced my original one. I always tell my interns to get their own copy. It is a gem.” And this is coming from one of the greatest trainers around today!
                              Sadly, Anthony Ditillo passed away over a decade ago now, but his writings and routines live on. A few of them have been collected below.


                              Anthony Ditillo Training Routines

                              Routine #1

                              This full schedule should be repeated 2 times per week. However, if you want, you could increase it to three times per week, but this is up to your ability to handle work.
                              Monday and Thursday:

                              Squat – One set of 10 reps, as a warmup, followed by five sets of five reps using all the weight possible for each set.
                              Deadlift – Same as Squat.
                              Bench Press – Same as Squat.
                              Bentover Row – Same as Squat.


                              Routine No. 2.

                              This kind of training routine is more severe and that is why you only do 2 movements per training day. You will be working these 2 movements quite hard and this will cause you to gain.

                              Monday:
                              Squat – 1×10; 1×8; 1×6; 1×4; 1×2 and then 5 sets of 3-5 reps using all the weight possible.
                              Bench Press – Same as squat.

                              Thursday:
                              Deadlift – same sets and reps as Monday.
                              Bentover Row – same sets and reps as Monday.


                              Routine No. 3.

                              This would be he ordinary every other day schedule for the ambitious, underweight trainee.

                              Monday, Wednesday and Friday:
                              Squat – 5 sets of 3 to 5 reps using all the weight possible.
                              Bench Press – same as Squat.
                              Deadlift – same as Squat.
                              d.) Bentover Row – same as Squat.


                              Routine No. 4.

                              This type of routine would enable you to concentrate on one movement per workout for power and the other two for added muscular bulk. However, you will positively have to be sure to eat enough of the complete protein foods and get more than enough calories in order to grow.

                              Monday:
                              Squat – 1 set of 10 for a warmup, and then 8-10 sets of 3 reps using all the weight you can possibly handle for each set.
                              Bench Press – 2 sets of 10 for a warmup and then 3 sets of 5 reps using all the weight you can possibly handle.
                              Bentover Row – 2 sets of 10 for a warmup and then 3 sets of 5 reps using all the weight you can possibly handle.

                              Thursday:
                              Deadlift – 1 set of 10 for a warmup, and then 8-10 sets of 3 reps using all the weight you can possibly handle for each set.
                              Bench Press – 2 sets of 10 reps, and then 3 sets of 5 reps using all the weight you can possibly handle.
                              Bentover Row - 2 sets of 10 reps, and then 3 sets of 5 reps using all the weight you can possibly handle.


                              Bulk And Power Routine No. 1

                              In this routine you will be performing the three basic power lifts. In it you use both low and high repetitions. This will allow you to gain in both muscular power and muscular size.

                              Monday, Wednesday and Friday:
                              Bench Press – 5 sets of 2-4 reps
                              Bench Press – 2 sets of 10 reps
                              Full Squat – 5 sets of 2-4 reps
                              Full Squat – 2 sets of 10 reps
                              Deadlift – 5 sets of 2-4 reps
                              Deadlift – 2 sets of 10 reps


                              Bulk And Power Routine No.2
                              In this routine I have you working for bulk in the upper body while you are specializing on the lower body for power. The sets and reps are well suited to gaining in both and I have even broken down the workouts themselves into three distinct sections. I have you working the chest and shoulders on Monday and the back and arms on Wednesday (rowing and cleans work the arms quite hard!). Then on Friday I have you really work your thighs and hips and back.

                              Monday:
                              Bench Press – 5 sets of 3-5 reps
                              Incline Press – 5 sets of 3-5 reps

                              Wednesday:
                              Bent Over Row – 5 sets of 3-5 reps
                              Hang Cleans – 5 sets of 3-5 reps

                              Friday:
                              Full Squat – 10 singles using 90% of your one rep limit
                              Deadlift – 10 singles using 90% of your one rep limit


                              Bulk And Power Routine No. 3
                              This routine has you training for power on the bench press and the seated press while your leg and back work aids in gaining size.

                              Monday:
                              Full Squat – 1 set of 20 reps using a weight which is 50lbs. greater than bodyweight. Take 5 deep breaths between each rep.
                              Deadlift – 1 set of 20 reps using a weight which is 50 lbs. greater than bodyweight. Take 5 deep breaths between each rep.
                              Heavy Bent Arm Pullover – 5 sets of 5-7 reps, maximum weight

                              Wednesday:
                              Full Squat – 5 sets of 5-7 reps
                              Deadlift – 5 sets of 5-7 reps
                              Bench Press – 10 singles with 90% of your 1 rep limit

                              Friday:
                              Half Squat – 5 sets of 3-5 reps
                              High Deadlift – 5 sets of 3-5 reps
                              Seated Press – 10 singles with 90% of your 1 rep limit


                              Bulk And Power Routine No. 4

                              Monday and Thursday:
                              Bench Press – 10 sets of 3 reps
                              Bent Row – 10 sets of 3 reps
                              Full Squat – 10 sets of 3 reps

                              Tuesday and Friday:
                              Incline Press – 5 sets of 5-7 reps
                              Deadlift – 5 sets of 5-7 reps
                              Half Squat – 5 sets of 5-7 reps


                              Bulk And Power Routine No. 5

                              Monday:
                              Full Squat – 10 sets of 3 reps
                              Dip – 5 sets of 5-7 reps
                              Weighted Chin – 5 sets of 5-7 reps

                              Wednesday:
                              Deadlift – 10 sets of 3 reps
                              Bent Arm Flyes – 5 sets of 5-7 reps
                              Curl – 5 sets of 5-7 reps

                              Friday:
                              Bench Press – 10 sets of 3 reps
                              Half Squat – 5 sets of 5-7 reps
                              Rack Deadlift – 5 sets of 5-7 reps


                              Intermediate Mass Program

                              The intermediate mass program is NOT for the advanced man. He would never respond to the amount of work I’m going to advise herein. Being advanced necessitates diversity in performance and volume of work as well as tightening up the dietary schedule, since continued weight gain would NOT be desirable for the truly advanced man who has already gained sufficiently in basic bodyweight. For the majority of beginners and intermediates, three total body workouts per week seems to be just about right. You will have two heavy days and one medium day, for variety and recuperation. On you two heavy days the movements are heavy and basic.

                              The repetitions are kept low to enable you to use truly heavy weights to ensure mass gains. The first and second sets should be warmup sets. Sets three, four and five are to be performed with all the weight possible for the required reps. Rest no longer than one minute between sets. When sets three, four and five can be done fairly easily, add ten pounds to your upper body movements and twenty pounds to the lower body movements. The entire schedule consists of between twenty-five and thirty sets. Surely this much work can be finished within ninety minutes.

                              Monday & Friday (heavy days)
                              Press Behind Neck – 5 sets of 5-7 reps.
                              Bentover Barbell Row – 5 sets of 8-10 reps.
                              Barbell Curl – 3 sets of 8-10 reps.
                              Lying Triceps Press – 3 sets of 8-10 reps.
                              Half Squat – 5 sets of 8-10 reps.
                              On your off days, do four or five sets of calf raises and light abdominal work.

                              Wednesday (medium day)
                              Dips – 4-5 bodyweight sets doing all the reps you can.
                              Chins – the same as dips.
                              Full Squats – 2 sets of 20 reps as described.
                              Stiff-Legged Deadlift – 2 sets of 10-15 reps using light to medium weight.






                              Skeggǫld, Skálmǫld, Skildir ro Klofnir.

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