Are You Stimulating or Annihilating?

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  • Are You Stimulating or Annihilating?

    Are You Stimulating or Annihilating?


    Ron Harris / Posted 09.17.2013

    One very surprising fact about Lee is that today, at 53 years old, he has no injuries, not even any nagging aches or pains.


    I get to speak with eight-time Mr. Olympia Lee Haney often, and that’s a real honor for me. He was the reigning Mr. Olympia when I first started reading the magazines and became a fan of the sport in 1987. It’s also significant that the very first Mr. Olympia contest I attended was the 1991 edition. It took place in Orlando, Florida, where I watched the TotaLee Awesome one defend his title a final time against a rising star from England named Dorian Yates. Lee announced his retirement at the end of the night, going out on top at only 31 years old. It’s safe to say that such a feat will never be duplicated.

    One very surprising fact about Lee is that today, at 53 years old, he has no injuries, not even any nagging aches or pains. For a casual lifter that wouldn’t be so impressive, but it’s unheard of these days among pro bodybuilders. News of torn quads, pecs and biceps hardly even merits front-page status anymore.

    I’m a full 10 years younger than Mr. Haney and not even a pro, yet my laundry list of injuries includes arthritis in both shoulders, a bone spur and nearly full loss of cartilage in the left shoulder, a full tear of the right triceps, chronic lower-back trouble that merely varies in pain level, tendinitis in the elbows and past partial tears of my right pec, a calf and a hamstring. Why am I so banged up when this great champion, who trained hard enough to hold off excellent challengers like Rich Gaspari, Lee Labrada, Mike Christian, Gary Strydom, Shawn Ray and Vince Taylor, has no lingering injuries or pain?

    The answer lies in Lee’s famous quote: “Stimulate, don’t annihilate.” Haney trained hard, but more important, he trained smart. He never used as much weight in training as he could have because he always understood the risk-to-benefits ratio.

    When we spoke about leg training not long ago, he mentioned that he squatted last in the workout so that he wouldn’t need to as much weight. That saved his spine from the pressure of constantly being crushed by 400 to 500 pounds or more, which he was more than capable of using. Instead, he stuck with 315 and still built his legs—but he saved his back. Meanwhile, the only other eight-time Mr. Olympia, Ronnie Coleman, was known for squatting up to 800 pounds and leg-pressing more than a ton. I doubt it’s a coincidence that Ronnie has had not one but three spinal surgeries over the past couple of years and still needs at least one more. My own back problems all stem from heavy squats. I always did them first and always went as heavy as I possibly could.

    More recently Lee and I talked about shoulder training. Lee’s shoulders were massive. I asked him how heavy he used to go on seated dumbbell presses. His surprising reply? Sixties, and on rare occasions he might have gone as heavy as 70s. For a split second I confess to a smug satisfaction. I’ve gone as heavy as 140s on those and still routinely handle anywhere from 105s to 120s. Then I mentally slapped myself. Dumb-ass! That’s why your shoulders are trashed and his aren’t!

    Lee believes in using good form and a smooth rep cadence that he often describes as a “check mark.” The lifting portion of the rep is ballistic, but the negative is always controlled. Most important, he always used a weight he could lift not only without assistance but also smoothly and without getting stuck and struggling. Many times I used weights on presses that I couldn’t get even one good rep with unless a spotter was helping. I trained much heavier than I should have, and I paid—and am still paying—the price.

    I could go on and on with more examples of how “light” Haney trained, but the point is that he very wisely chose to train with just enough weight to get the job done—and no more. Heavy weights do have a place but only up to a point. If you’re putting just as much stress on your joints and connective tissues as you are your muscles, eventually you will find yourself injured or at the very least with a lot of nagging aches and pains that never go away and that come to limit what you can do in the gym.

    My wife doesn’t believe that I can put on any more size, simply because all my injuries make it impossible for me to train as heavy as I used to on many exercises. She isn’t completely off base with that, but the more accurate way of putting it is not that I am limited by having to train lighter, but that my limitations are the direct result of going too heavy for many years when I should have gone lighter. I let my ego get the best of me.

    We tend to think in terms of more is better, and getting stronger does go hand in hand with getting bigger—up to a point. We all need to figure out what that line is for us, individually, and avoid overstepping it.

    It’s too late for me, as the damage has been done, but it’s not too late for many who are reading this. The next time you choose a weight, ask yourself, “Will this stimulate or annihilate?”
    —Ron Harris

    Editor’s note: Ron Harris is the author of Real Bodybuilding—Muscle Truth From 25 Years In the Trenches, available at www.RonHarrisMuscle.com.
    I know from teaching hundreds of seminars that the guys who say they have “awesome technique” are usually the biggest disasters—their ego just doesn’t let them see it.
    - Dave Tate

  • #2
    Ligt dat dan niet meer aan zijn techniek dan aan die gewichten? Anders zouden alle powerlifters toch ook constant blessures moeten hebben?
    Ik doe een gok

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Pren View Post
      Ligt dat dan niet meer aan zijn techniek dan aan die gewichten? Anders zouden alle powerlifters toch ook constant blessures moeten hebben?
      Hoe dichter je bij je grens zit, ernstiger de blessure mocht er wat mis gaan. En als je vaker bij je grens zit vergroot je de kans met nog een factor. En ja, als je techniek ook nog eens wat te wensen over laat dan komt er nog een factor bij.

      Dacht jij echt dat powerlifters gevrijwaard zijn van blessures? Er zitten een paar tussen met een vrij indrukwekkende lijst blessures, waaronder Dave Tate. Dit is zijn lijst:
      Originally posted by Dave Tate
      "Unfortunately, my injury total has also been accumulating. Here's a brief summary of all my major injuries, starting with my first one in 1986. I'll begin with the calves and move up. Also keep in mind that these are just the major ones that left me immobile for more than a week:

      • Calves: I've torn both of them, leaving a huge indentation in each.
      • Right Knee: Back in the late 80's I strained my ACL and that left me on crutches for two weeks. I've had three other similar strains since that time.
      • Right Hamstring: I tore this hamstring so badly that I nearly needed surgery to fix it.
      • Left Knee: I've partially torn my patellar tendon. This wasn't bad, pain-wise, but it did mess up my squatting for four months.
      • Quad: I pulled my right quad in the early 90's. It was so bad that it turned my entire leg black.
      • Groin: I've injured my groin on both the right and left sides. This was a year of hell where there was nothing I could do to get it fixed. So I just wrapped it up and dealt with it. After a year it got better.
      • Lower Abdominal: I tore my lower abdominal muscles seven years ago. I did this while squatting and it was perhaps the most painful injury I've ever had.
      • Spine: The following discs are herniated: L4, L5, C4, C5. C4 and C5 left my hand numb for a few months. L4 and L5 occurred over 14 years ago and required me to take two months off training
      • Intercostals: I've strained two on each side over the past ten years.
      • Left pec: I tore this muscle at the tendon and needed surgery to repair it.
      • Right pec: I tore this muscle in half but decided to not have surgery since the tendon was still attached.
      • Both pecs: I've torn each at least 20 times and each time caused the entire pec to turn black and blue. All of these happened before the above pec injuries.
      • Right shoulder: I've had a torn supraspinatus, bone spurs, and now have arthritis. I had this shoulder cleaned up with the AC shaved down to allow more movement, but am now experiencing almost all the same ailments in the same shoulder. Doctors are talking replacement.
      • Left shoulder: This one also has arthritis, but isn't as bad as the other."
      I know from teaching hundreds of seminars that the guys who say they have “awesome technique” are usually the biggest disasters—their ego just doesn’t let them see it.
      - Dave Tate

      Comment


      • #4
        Oh nee zeker niet. Natuurlijk hebben zij ook blessures. Maar de auteur wijt zijn blessures vrijwel volledig aan het gebruikte gewicht en dat lijkt me onzin. Het zal wel meespelen, maar ik denk dat een matige techniek toch de grootste oorzaak is.
        Ik doe een gok

        Comment


        • #5
          Het punt is dat je als bodybuilder niet meedoet aan "wie is de sterkste man" wedstrijden. Dus het is niet nodig om continu zoveel mogelijk gewicht te verzetten.

          Behalve de auteur zijn er nog andere voorbeelden van bekende bodybuilders van wie bekend is dat zij met zware gewichten trainen en een aardige lijst blessures hebben opgelopen gedurende hun carrieres. Ronnie Coleman wordt in het artikel genoemd. Dan heb je nog Dorian Yates, Jean Pierre Fuchs, Branch Warren, etc.

          Meer gewicht zorgt voor meer belasting en als je continu zwaar tilt kan het gebeuren dan een spier of pees overbelast raakt. En regelmatig gewichten tillen die op het randje zijn, dus waardoor je techniek ook achteruit gaat, dat helpt niet.

          En ja, de techniek speelt ook een rol. Maar dit lijkt mij eerder een geval van techniek die achteruit gaat vanwege de hele zware gewichten. Daar heeft hij het zelf over:

          Originally posted by Ron Harris
          Many times I used weights on presses that I couldn’t get even one good rep with unless a spotter was helping.
          Hoe dan ook, Lee Haney trainde met relatief lichte gewichten en kwam daar heel erg ver mee. Hij won net als Coleman 8x de Mr O titel, maar heeft geen last van pijntjes terwijl dat bij Coleman niet het geval is.
          I know from teaching hundreds of seminars that the guys who say they have “awesome technique” are usually the biggest disasters—their ego just doesn’t let them see it.
          - Dave Tate

          Comment


          • #6
            Prima stukje

            vandaar dat ik ook overgestapt ben op trap bar deads omdat die de erector meer ontlasten .

            en sinds vorige week ben ik ook gestart. Met hip belt squats .

            het risico op blessure probeer ik zoveel mogelijk te vermijden , zelfs al loop ik hierdoor wss een stukje massabouw mis .

            maar ik zou graag nog jaren willen massa bouwen en een zware blessure zou dit zeker kunnen verhinderen
            You gotta love yourself ! If you've been training for more then a year and your afraid to show your muscle then ... WHY are you doing it for ? Thats like being a millionaire and still homeless Kali Muscle

            The upper back is the new chest Defranco

            Comment

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